Modo n.º41

Generative and collective mural painting
Gisèle Guillemot High School, Mondeville, France
November 2020
52 participants

Project carried out with 52 students as part of the Festival Palma.

Modo n.º39

“10 kolommen” generative and collective mural painting
Heerlen, Netherlands
August 2020
130 participants

Project produced by the Stichting Street Art Fondation and curated by Approved By Pablo.

The building has 130 apartments. After measuring the wall and analyzing the structure of the building, I found an easy and logical way to divide the façade in 130 cells. Before starting the painting, we went door to door and asked the residents to run a generative protocol to create what would be painted in each cell. Almost all of the 130 shapes on the wall were generated by the residents of the building.

Production : Lars Ickenroth
Assistant : Dazetwo
Photographer : Sanne Gijsbers

1 KM.

During the confinement established to face the COVID-19 crisis in France, a rule was put into place that permitted “brief displacements, within the limit of one hour daily and within a maximum radius of one kilometer around the place of residence”. (https://media.interieur.gouv.fr/deplacement-covid-19/).

Following this rule, I traced a 1 km radius circle on a map around my house and decided to walk on each and every path I could to reach the imposed limit. Arriving at the “border”, I drew a line on the floor. Once the legal limit of my movements was marked, I turned around and walked back home before reaching the one hour time limit.

The result are fragments of a circle delimiting my personal border. The distance is based on the position of one’s house, so each person has their own border. My goal was to reach this intangible limit and, from there, contemplate the temporarily inaccessible beyond.

I finished the 1 KM. project on May 10th 2020, one day before the end of the confinement in France. I reached 21 border points and wandered around 60 km in total.

A huge documentation is available below. You can click on the pictures to see them bigger.



P1

Straight line distance from home: 1 km
Walking distance from home: 1,4 km
36 minutes round trip

P2

Straight line distance from home: 1 km
Walking distance from home: 1,3 km
32 minutes round trip

P3

Straight line distance from home: 1 km
Walking distance from home: 1,7 km
44 minutes round trip

P4

Straight line distance from home: 1 km
Walking distance from home: 1,3 km
32 minutes round trip

P5

Straight line distance from home: 1 km
Walking distance from home: 1,5 km
44 minutes round trip

P6

Straight line distance from home: 1 km
Walking distance from home: 1,2 km
38 minutes round trip

P7

Straight line distance from home: 1 km
Walking distance from home: 1,4 km
44 minutes round trip

P8

Straight line distance from home: 1 km
Walking distance from home: 1,5 km
46 minutes round trip

P9

Straight line distance from home: 1 km
Walking distance from home: 1,6 km
46 minutes round trip

P10

Straight line distance from home: 1 km
Walking distance from home: 1,7 km
44 minutes round trip

P11

Straight line distance from home: 1 km
Walking distance from home: 1,7 km
42 minutes round trip

P12

Straight line distance from home: 1 km
Walking distance from home: 1,6 km
42 minutes round trip

P13

Straight line distance from home: 1 km
Walking distance from home: 2,1 km
50 minutes round trip

P14

Straight line distance from home: 1 km
Walking distance from home: 1,6 km
42 minutes round trip

P15

Straight line distance from home: 1 km
Walking distance from home: 1,4 km
36 minutes round trip

P16

Straight line distance from home: 1 km
Walking distance from home: 1,3 km
35 minutes round trip

P17

Straight line distance from home: 1 km
Walking distance from home: 1,4 km
34 minutes round trip

P18

Straight line distance from home: 1 km
Walking distance from home: 1,8 km
45 minutes round trip

P19

Straight line distance from home: 1 km
Walking distance from home: 1,7 km
38 minutes round trip

P20

Straight line distance from home: 1 km
Walking distance from home: 2,1 km
52 minutes round trip

P21

Straight line distance from home: 1 km
Walking distance from home: 1,4 km
36 minutes round trip

Promenades Journal

Ongoing project
November 2013 – today

The Promenades Project is about walking, observation and spontaneity. It’s about wandering in the city with no pressure, no time limit, no goal apart from walking and enjoying it. It’s about walking with total freedom of time and space to be able to do all that things that you always want to do but you don’t because you have no time. It’s about moving crosscurrent in the city with time for contemplation to be able to observe details that most people don’t notice.

eltono-promenades

Rules

Rule #1: Walk and, if possible, create something on the way.
Rule #2: Only use material found during the walk – the only material I allow myself to bring is for
documentation (notebook, phone, camera) and a bag.
Rule #3: Only execute ideas created during the walk – or a predecessor walk.
Rule #4: Enjoy the walk.

This journal is a straight chronological transcription of what happened during each walk.

Muban – Urban Drift Experiment

Muban (木板, “wood board” in Chinese)
Urban drift experiment with wooden boards
Beijing, China 2011 – 2013

Muban is an experiment about movement and material recuperation. Since I moved to China, I have been observing how people constantly recycle everything – from cardboard boxes and plastic bottles to bricks, doors and windows from demolished buildings. These materials are immediately collected and sold by the kilo or directly reused. I wanted to see what would happen if I threw my own material out onto the street. where would it end up? How would it be used? I bought some thin plywood boards, and had them cut (81 x 61 cm). On either side of each board I painted white shapes to be able to spot them easily. Each board was given a slightly different design so I could differentiate and follow them. Then, I left them in the street and waited to see what would happen.

Muban A, Caijing donglu

Eltono-MubanA-x18

One day on my way to my daily Chinese classes, I found a shortcut passing through a “hutong” neighborhood. I found it so interesting, compared with the rest of the over-urbanized area around, that I decided to pass through there everyday. The people living there were very kind, always smiling and open to communication. I decided to do the first Muban experiment in this neighborhood because it was quite small, had one story homes and very few residents lived there. Furthermore, as I was walking or biking through it everyday, I would be able to observe the pieces and how they moved twice a day. I prepared the first nine Mubans in my studio and one night, I deposited them around the tiny hutong streets. I distributed the boards into four sets: one containing three boards and the other three containing two. They disappeared very fast and, only once (18 days later), was I able to see a set of two boards (A6 and A7) reappear again in an adjacent street before it was completely gone. I abandoned the nine boards in November of 2011 and I continued to observe until the summer of 2012. Today this neighborhood is almost completely gone. Most of the people have lost their homes and have been forced to move somewhere else in order to build more towers and skyscrapers.

Click on the images to enlarge them and read the captions to follow the story.

Muban A1, A4 and A5:

Muban A2 and A9:

Muban A3 and A8:

Muban A6 and A7:

This is how this hutong neighborhood looks today (June 2013). In almost every picture you can see some tall buildings surrounding the area – this is what they’ve planned to build here, more towers, once the last residents have been kicked out.

Muban B, Chengfulu

Eltono-MubanB-x18

Things got a little bit better with the second experiment, I got a couple of very interesting results and I was able to draw a map of the movements. I painted nine boards again and I deposited them, one by one this time, in a small residential area very close to my house. Since then, I have walked around or biked through this neighborhood almost everyday trying to spot the boards. After so many hours observing and looking for the white geometric designs, I developed a new ability and was able to detect them quite easily.

Click on the images to enlarge them and read the captions to follow the story.

The records of Muban B1 to B9 are presented in chronological order.

Muban B1:

Muban B2:

Muban B3:

Muban B5:

Muban B4:

Muban B9:

Muban B8:

Muban B6:

Muban B7:

Eltono Muban B map

I learned many interesting things while doing the Muban project such as how to be discreet to avoid ruining the experience, how to appear lost when you know exactly where you are going and a variety of interesting habits and quirky personality traits belonging to the Beijingers who live in these communities. This experiment is an ongoing project. The pieces must be observed for a very long time so it’s not an easy project to start just anywhere. I’m looking forward to continuing with it and I hope to be able to report more results. If by any chance, any of the above listed Mubans reappear, I’ll post the update here.